PHOENIX DOG TRAINING SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH STUDIES

PHOENIX DOG TRAINING

PHOENIX DOG TRAINING BELIEVES IN KEEPING CURRENT IN, CANINE COGNITION SCIENCE,  THE SCIENCE OF HOW DOGS THINK, SCIENCE OF HOW DOGS LEARN, THE LATEST SCIENCE AND RESEARCH IN DOG TRAINING, AND SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH IN DOG TRAINING SCIENCE, DOG BEHAVIOR SCIENCES. OUR PHOENIX DOG TRAINER, OUR PHOENIX DOG BEHAVIORIST, DID POST GRADUATE WORK AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY IN DOG PSYCHOLOGY, DOG CLASSICAL CONDITIONING, DOG OPERANT CONDITIONING, BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE IN DOGS, DOG AGGRESSION, DOG ANXIETY, AND DOG NEUROCHEMICAL IMBALANCES AND NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS OF DOGS.

There has been a flurry of work on dogs in the last several years that suggest dogs make seemingly impressive use of human social cues. In fact, Paul Bloom comments, “this may signal the emergence of a vibrant area of comparative cognition. For psychologists, dogs may be the next chimpanzees.” Leaving aside the question of whom is happier about this: the dogs or the chimps, the fact remains that dogs have been the focus of a great deal of work recently. Good news for those of us who spend our days thinking about what goes on in between those little ears. Perhaps though, the work is as interesting for what it reveals about how researchers approach the topic as it is for what it reveals about man’s best friend. This course was an intensive review and critical analysis of the latest work on dog development, cognition and learning, supplemented by some of the classics and a guest appearance or two. We will cover the following topics:

  • Wolf & Wild Canid Behavior
  • Evolution and Development
  • Perception
  • Cue Understanding: attention, word and gesture
  • Imitation & Social Learning
  • Emotion • Temperament
  • Experimental design and analysis

The focus of the coursework was on the practical application of the above material. Finally, we used this investigation to reflect more generally on how we think about cognition and learning in other animals, including ourselves, at Phoenix Dog Training.

  • Coppinger, R. and L. Coppinger (2001). Dogs: A Startling New Understanding of Canine Origin, Behavior, and Evolution. New York, NY, Scribner.
  • Jensen, P., Ed. (2007). The Behavioural Biology of Dogs. Cambridge, MA., CAB International.
  • Horowitz, A. (2009). Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell and Know. New York, NY, Scribner..
  • LeDoux, J. (2002). Synaptic Self: How our Brains Become Who We Are. New York, NY, Penguin Books. Selected chapters.
  • Scott, J. P. and J. L. Fuller (1965). Genetics and the Social Behavior of the Dog. Chicago, Chicago University Press.
  • D. Mech and L. Boitani. Wolves: Behavior, Ecology and Conservation. L. Chicago, IL, University of Chicago Press.
  • D.W. MacDonald and C. Sillero-Zubiri, Eds (2004) Biology and Conservation of Wild Canids. Oxford UK., Oxford University Press.
  • Martin, P. and P. Bateson (1993). Measuring Behaviour: An Introductory Guide. Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press.
  • Coren, S. (2004). How Dogs Think: Understanding the Canine Mind. New York, NY, Free Press.

Phoenix Dog Training, Scientific Study and Scientific Research at Harvard Canine Cognition Lab

Introduction: Savant or Slacker Setting the Stage

  • Udell, M. and C. Wynne (2008). “A Review of Domestic Dogs Human-like Behaviors: Or Why Behavior Analysts Should Stop Worrying and Love Their Dogs.” Journal of Experimental Analysis of Behavior 89(2): 247-251.
  • Horowitz, A. (2009). “Disambiguating the “guilty look”: Salient Prompts to a familiar dog behaviour.” Behavioural Processes 81: 447-452. • Jensen Chapter 4. Wolf and Wild Canid Behavior.• Jensen, Chapters 7 & 9. • Optional:  Packard, J. M. (2003). Wolf Behavior: Reproductive, Social and Intelligent. Wolves: Behavior, Ecology and Conservation. L. D. Mech and L. Boitani. Chicago, IL, University of Chicago Press: 35-65. Class 4 Perception & Communication in Wolves & Dogs.
  • Horowitz, Chapters “Umwelt” through and including “Dog-eyed”.
  • Jensen, Chapter 6 • Optional: o McGreevy, P., T. Grassi, et al. (2003). “A Strong Correlation Exists between the Distribution of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Nose Length in the Dog.” Brain, Behavior and Evolution 63(1): 13-22.*  Quaranta, A., M. Siniscalchi, et al. (2007). “Asymmetric tail-wagging responses by dogs to different emotive stimuli. .” Current Biology 17(6): R199-201. Origins of the Dog, Part 1: Molecular Genetics.
  • Jensen Chapters 2 & 3. • Optional:  Lindblad-Toh, K., C. M. Wade, et al. (2005). “Genome sequence, comparative analysis and haplotype structure of the domestic dog.” Nature 438(7069): 803-819.*  Pennisi, E. (2004). Genome Resources to Boost Canine’s Role in Gene Hunts. Science. 304: 1093-1095.*  Parker, H., L. Kim, et al. (2004). Genetic Structure of the Purebred Domestic Dog. Science. 304: 1160-1164.*  Origins of the Dog: Coppinger & Belyaev.
  • Coppinger, R. and L. Coppinger (2001). Dogs: A Startling New Understanding of Canine Origin, Behavior, and Evolution. New York, NY, Scribner. Chapters 1-3.
  • Optional: o Trut, L. (1999). Early Canid Domestication; The Farm Fox Experiment. American Scientist. 87: 160-169*  Development.
  • Coppinger, R. and L. Coppinger (2001). Dogs: A Startling New Understanding of Canine Origin, Behavior, and Evolution. New York, NY, Scribner. Chapters 4 (up to page 119) & 6  Temperament.
  • Jensen, Chapters 10 & 11. • Serpell, J. and Y. Hsu (2001). “Development and validation of a novel method for evaluating behavior and temperament in guide dogs.” Applied Animal Behaviour Science 72: 347-364.**  The Emotional  Dog, Jensen Chapter 5.
  • LeDoux, J. (2007). “The Amygdala.” Current Biology 17(20): 868-874.
  • Optional: LeDoux, J. (1996). The Synaptic Self. New York, NY, Penguin Books. Chapters 3,4,8,9.   Social Cognition.
  • Horowitz, Chapters “Seen by a dog” through and including “Noble Mind”.
  • Optional: Hare, B., M. Brown, et al. (2002). “The domestication of social cognition in dogs.” Science 298: 1634-1636, Hare, B., I. Plyusnina, et al. (2005). “Social Cognitive Evolution in Captive Foxes Is a Correlated By-Product of Experimental Domestication.” Current Biology 15: 226-230.* Miklosi, A., E. Kubinyi, et al. (2003). “A Simple Reason for a Big Difference: Wolves Do Not Look Back at Humans, but Dogs Do.” Current Biology 13(9): 763-766.* Simple but Reliable Rules 4.
  • Jensen, Chapter 12.
  • Optional: Collier-Baker, E., J. M. Davis, et al. (2004). “Do Dogs (Canis familiaris) Understand Invisible Displacement?” Journal of Comparative Psychology 118(4): 421-433.* Osthaus, B., S. E. G. Lea, et al. (2005). “Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) fail to show understanding of means-end connections in a string-pulling task.” Animal Cognition 8: 37-47.*  Frank, H. and M. G. Frank (1985). “Comparative manipulation-test performance in ten-week-old wolves (Canis lupus) and Alaskan malamutes (Canis familiaris): a Piagetian interpretation.” Journal of Comparative Psychology 99(3): 266-274.*  Dogs and Words.
  • Warden, C. J. and L. H. Warner (1928). “The sensory capacities and intelligence of dogs, with a report on the ability of the noted dog “Fellow” to respond to verbal stimuli.” The Quarterly Review of Biology.
  • Kaminski, J., J. Call, et al. (2004). “Word Learning in a Domestic Dog: Evidence for “Fast Mapping”.” Science 304: 1682-1683.*
  • Bloom, P. (2004). Can a Dog Learn a Word? Science. 304: 1605-1606.*
  • Markman, E. M. and M. Abelev (2004). “Word learning in dogs?” Trends in Cognitive Science 8(11): 479-480.*
  • Fischer, J., J. Call, et al. (2004). “A pluralistic account of word learning.” Trends in Cognitive Science 8(11): 481.*  Introduction to Learning Theory & Social Learning.
  • Jensen, Chapter 8
  • Optional: Shettleworth, S. J. (2001). “Animal cognition and animal behavior.” Animal Behaviour 61(2): 277-288. Range, F., Z. Viranyi, et al. (2007). “Selective Imitation in Domestic Dogs.” Current Biology 17: 1-5. Adler, L. and H. E. Adler (1977). “Ontogeny of observational learning in the dog (canis familiaris).” Developmental Psychobiology 10: 267-271.* Slabbert, J. M. and O. A. E. Rosa (1997). “Observational learning of an acquired maternal behavior pattern by working dog pups: an alternative training method?” Applied Animal Behaviour Science 53: 309-316. Pongracz, P., A. Miklosi, et al. (2003). “Interaction between individual experience and social learning in dogs.” Animal Behaviour 65(3): 595-603.* Dogs and People: Theory and Practice.
  • Horowitz, Chapters “Inside of a Dog.”

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