Category Archives: Dog Training

positive reinforcement dog training

POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT DOG TRAINING

POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT DOG TRAINING

POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT DOG TRAINING is a MUST if you want a HAPPY DOG, that enjoys doing the work.

positive reinforcement dog training

In today’s dog training you will hear a lot about POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT DOG TRAINING. 

I use mostly positive reinforcement in the dog training that I do.  There was a time when all I did was positive reinforcement dog training.  Prior to that the dog training I learned back in the 1970’s had very little positive reinforcement.  Dog Training back then was harsh, heavy compulsion training.

The dogs got trained, but you could tell by the look in the dog’s face and its body language that the type of compulsion training that was being done had fallout.  In this case it was the mental well being of the dog. 

So back in the 70’s  most dog training was heavy compulsion training that involved heavy leash and collar corrections usually a prong collar or a choke chain.

Then in the 1980’s the dog training pendulum swung far in the opposite direction to the use of positive reinforcement dog training.  “CLICKER TRAINING” by pioneer Karen Pryor, took off like crazy.  It got to the point that dog trainers gave up corrections completely, everything became total positive reinforcement dog training.  Pryor and her group of clicker training devotes extolled the use of TPR or Total Positive Reinforcement.

The Clicker trainers took over, at least the voice of clicker trainers did, and boy were they vocal.  This trend of Total Positive Reinforcement Trainers started to claim only their brand of training was science based, which is false.  Science based dog training includes positive reinforcement but it also includes negative reinforcement and punishment.

Positive Reinforcement Dog Training and the positive reinforcement only dog trainers began a nationwide campaign to vilify any dog trainer that used correction no matter how mild the correction might be.

They made big claims that ANY behavior could be trained in or trained out with positive reinforcement dog training ONLY.  This included severe dog aggression to humans with a severe bite history.

Positive Reinforcement Dog Training 01

Fast forward to 2018 and realize that over the last 30 years dog bite hospital admissions tripled.  Dog Trainers that are total positive reinforcement had had a feel good marketing campaign since the beginning.  Their claim, ALL DOGS and ALL BEHAVIOR can be modified with total positive reinforcement and food.

When the total positive reinforcement only dog trainers fail to get the desired results such as with a dog with a bite history and severe aggression to humans, their answer is to euthanize the dog.

Really!? They want to euthanize the dog.  They will kill a dog before using a correction.  They deem the dog “untrainable.”

Today more and more dog trainers and more and more dog owners are taking a balanced approach to dog training using a lot of positive reinforcement, but also using humane corrections, punishment and negative reinforcement.

Great dog trainers go beyond total positive reinforcement and are highly skilled in the use of negative reinforcement and punishment.  These dog trainers are skilled at using corrections that DO NOT CAUSE any psychological damage to the dog.

Be careful when looking for dog training for your dog.  If it sounds too good to be true it probably is.  If you have a dog with difficult behavior problems, positive reinforcement dog training ONLY has limitations.  You are taking away half of the way animals communicate.  

Dogs correct other dogs!  I’ve never met a total positive reinforcement DOG!


Dog Trainer Secrets German Shepherd Dog

DOG TRAINING SECRET

DOG TRAINING SECRET

Dog Training Secret

“Take your dog everywhere you go and don’t let it be a JERK!”

Dog Training Car MannersNot too long ago I ended up with a dog, a big dog, a big German Shepherd Dog.  I was not looking for a dog, and I definitely was not looking for a large breed dog.  The timing of ending up with another unplanned dog into my life was inconvenient to say the least. Sometimes life gives us unexpected surprises.  In this case it was “Nizzy,” who taught me the greatest Dog Training Secret there is. “Take your dog everywhere you go and don’t let it be a JERK!”

I’m  blessed to have a very successful dog training business in Phoenix Arizona, the Nation’s 4th largest metropolis.  There are tons of dogs that need dog training help and that means that as a dog behaviorist and dog trainer I stay extremely busy.

Phoenix Dog TrainersThis year marks 43 years that I have been personally training dogs.  I started at the age of 9 as a junior handler competing in AKC Obedience Matches and putting titles on dogs.  

Throughout the many years of training and working with various breed of dogs, different age dogs, and probably every behavior problem imaginable to a dog, I always get asked what is the secret to a well trained dog, and I have many times just shouted back, “its all about consistency and repetition.” 

I always get asked what is the secret to a well trained dog, and I have many times just shouted back, “its all about consistency and repetition.” 

While those are two very important aspects to a well trained dog that a lot of dog trainers would agree with, put 100 dog trainers all in a room together and ask them whats is the most important dog training secret, and you will probably get 100 different answers.

I have not had hardly any time to train “Nizzy” the Big German Shepherd Dog.  It might come as a surprise to many dog owners, not all dog trainers dogs are well trained.  One main reason is that they are so busy training other peoples dogs, they don’t have much time at all to train with or work with their own dogs.

Because I’m so busy and I did not want to have to leave “Nizzy” the GSD at home for long hours on end, I decided I would just have to take her with me everywhere I went despite it being a pain in my butt, I did just that.  “Nizzy” went with me pretty much everywhere I go.

dog training secret 3I took her to where I do volunteer work on Fridays.  She is the “Office Mascot.”  Everybody loves her.  I never wanted her to be a problem for anyone at the office where I do volunteer work at so in the beginning I had a leash on her that she would drag.  When she started to get into someones personal space, I called her to me and if need be I gave a tug guiding her back to me and away for the person or people in the office.

At times when she was calm and aloof to the people who were in the office I let “Nizzy” meet them and be pet by them briefly.  any excitable energy that is not calm got corrected with the leash.  We are not here to play.  Play happens outside. Calm happens inside.

Play happens outside. Calm happens inside.

I had group dog training classes to teach, and I brought “Nizzy” with me even though my students dogs were better trained.  Besides, I had gotten in the habit of telling people. “I’m not sure if I am keeping this dog.  I don’t have time for her, and I don’t have time to train her.”

During the group dog training class I was teaching I would sometimes just keep “Nizzy” on leash next to me.  Sometimes I would have her lay down a little bit out of the way of the other dogs who were there to train.  “Nizzy” is not there to train.

Many of the dogs in the group classes I teach are reactive or aggressive so it is important that “Nizzy” stays calm and not reactive at all herself.  I was always very close to her to correct her with the leash if she even got slightly excited around those reactive dogs in my group.

I also had to take “Nizzy” to my private lesson appointments with me too.  In Arizona it can get hot fast.  Hell, there are not many days in Arizona that are not hot.  I was able to leave “Nizzy” in the vehicle in the early morning but by mid afternoon and definitely late afternoon, it was too hot to keep her in the car.  

I remember at first thinking to myself, “what are my clients going to think when they see me with this untrained dog?”  I remember thinking that they will see me as a “REAL” person with a dog.

During private lessons I would bring “Nizzy” in the client’s house, outside in their back yard, or outside in the front of the house.  When I would go with clients to the park, or to train near a dog park for distractions, or to train inside of Home Depot for distractions, I took “Nizzy” with me.  If she became a jerk I just gave a a quick leash correction and she would settle down. 

Dog Trainer Secrets German Shepherd DogWell it has been 11 months now, I still don’t have time to train “Nizzy,” and I guess now I’m keeping her. LOL. She still goes everywhere with me.  I can’t tell you the number of places she has been with me, or the number of dogs and people we met, or the number of green belts and parks we have stopped at.   I’m sure we have been to the store, the dry cleaners, the car wash, the bank, the pet store and everywhere else I go on a daily basis a couple hundred times now.  It dawned on me the other day while I had not had any time to train “Nizzy”, I took her everywhere I went and my only rule was she can not be a jerk.  We have accomplished this and “Nizzy” has somehow gotten very well trained in the process despite me.

“Nizzy” has taught me that the number one dog training secret is to take your dog everywhere and don’t let them be a jerk. 

DOG TRAINING SECRET

“Take your dog everywhere you go and don’t let it be a JERK!”

 

 

 


Dog Training Phoenix Off-Leash Dog Obedience

DOG TRAINING PHOENIX

DOG TRAINING PHOENIX

DOG TRAINING PHOENIX provides the highest quality Dog Training, Puppy Training, Dog Aggression Training and Dog Behavior Modification.

We work with Dogs with aggression, dogs with anxiety and dogs with severe phobias.  Dog Training Phoenix also trains just plain old pet dogs that need to have basic manners and basic dog obedience training.

Dog Training Phoenix

Dog Training Phoenix has over 42 years of both professional dog training and competitive dog obedience training.

Dog Training Phoenix specializes in difficult to severe dog behavior problems and off-leash trained dogs that are reliable in the face of extreme distractions. 

If you have a dog that can not listen and behave as well as be reliable with it’s dog obedience commands, your dog is not safely or properly trained.

I realize there are leash laws, but a leash on a dog does not guarantee the behavior of a dog.  a dog on leash is restrained, not necessarily a trained dog.

CALL FOR IMMEDIATE HELP (602) 769-1411

Dog Training Phoenix Off-Leash Dog Obedience

Distraction Training in Dog Training is the most important aspect of dog training.  it is when there are big distractions that you really need your dog training to work reliably well.  We usually don’t have too much trouble getting the dog to listen when its just you and your dog inside the house all alone in the quiet of evening.

Where we often have difficulty in our dog training is when there are crazy and intense distractions when guests come to the home or when we are off property with our dogs.

Dog Training Phoenix AZ

  • Do you have a dog that goes crazy when guests come to the house?
  • Do you have a dog that goes crazy on walks when ever a dog or person is approaching?
  • Do you have a dog that is barking excessively?
  • Do you have a dog that is hyper, jumping, or too excitable?
  • Do you have a dog that is aggressive towards dogs or people?
  • Do you have a dog that is fearful, shy, or has anxiety?
  • Do you have a dog that is destructive?
  • Do you have a puppy or dog that is difficult to potty train or house train?
  • Do you have a stubborn dog or a dog that just won’t listen?

DOG TRAINING PHOENIX BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION

Perhaps you have a dog that has a very difficult dog behavior that typical dog trainers are not educated or experienced enough to help.  Phoenix Dog Training has the only Dog Behaviorist that Specializes in Canine Cognition, Dog Aggression and Dog Fears in the state of Arizona.

dog behaviorist phoenix az

DOG TRAINING PHOENIX IN-HOME PRIVATE DOG TRAINING

The best place to train your dog is at your own home with private in-home dog training.  most behavior problems occur at home, on property or in the neighborhood that you live in.  This is why you want to always opt for private in-home dog training versus any type of group dog training classes.

The worst place to begin training your dog is in group dog training classes.  It might sound like a good idea, and the cost might be less for dog training group classes, but our experience has proved to us that it is not a good idea to take dogs with little to no training and dog owners with little to no training being able to handle or train their dog, and put all of these unskilled dog owners and untrained dogs in a large group.

Dog Training Phoenix Dog Obedience Class

Rather than being able to successfully train your dog, you usually have chaos and very few dogs in the dog class get the proper dog training instruction that they need.

We get many dog owners that use our dog training services and they had already previously had been in group dog obedience classes before.  The common problem is that their dog won’t listen when distracted and their dog wont listen without bribing their dog with food.

DOG TRAINING PHOENIX DOES NOT RECOMMEND SENDING YOUR DOG AWAY TO A BOARD AND TRAIN FACILITY

Dog Training Phoenix Dog Board and Train

WARNING 28 DOGS DIE AT   DOG BOARD AND TRAIN FACILITY IN CAVE CREEK ARIZONA THAT WERE SENT TO THEIR DOG BOARD AND TRAIN PROGRAM.

It is very common for dogs to get injured, get sick, or even have a tragedy of dogs dying at dog board and train facilities. 

Many dogs come home from a dog training facility with ok obedience but soon revert back to their old behavior problems and patterns.  Dogs are very context specific learners.  What that means is that dogs tend to associate learning in context of location.  Dogs do much better with private in-home dog training.  You the dog owner needs as much training or even more training than your dog needs obedience training.

Be sure to read our Phoenix Dog Training Blog article on Dog Board and Train Programs in Phoenix Arizona. 

DOG TRAINING PHOENIX PUPPY TRAINING AND OBEDIENCE

We love training puppies at Dog Training Phoenix.  We start puppy training right away.  We have even begun to teach dog breeders the importance of starting to train puppies as early as three weeks of age.

Also you have from 3 weeks of age to 3 months of age to properly socialize your puppy and get your puppy exposed to other dogs, other animals, people, children, noises, textures, and the outside world that can be full of many fearful things for dogs.

Many people wait too long to get their dogs out in public and get them socialized and exposed to outside stimuli.  The result is they end up with a puppy that is anxious, fearful, phobic, or aggressive if not all of these.

Recently Dog Training Phoenix Dog Behaviorist and Master Dog Trainer Appeared on TV to discuss the Top 3 Mistakes People Make in Training their Puppy. Watch the Video Below.

CONTACT US TODAY FOR HELP TRAINING YOUR PUPPY OR DOG.

(602) 769-1411


Marker Training Dog Training

DOG TRAINING WITH MARKERS

MARKER TRAINING IN DOG TRAINING: WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

Marker Training Dog Training

Marker Training is one of the most important aspects of dog training.  Marker Training is a communication system, a system of communication that pairs “markers” with behaviors, rewards, and consequences like a correction.

Phoenix Dog Training uses a Marker Training System with all of the clients we work with and all the dogs we help train.  Let me start by sharing the “markers” we use.

  • Clicker = Reward Marker
  • “Yes” = Reward Marker
  • “Ready” = Start Training Marker
  • “Ah Ah” = No Reward Marker
  • “Good” = Keep Going or Keep Doing What You Are Doing (Duration) Marker
  • “Break” = Done Training Marker

MARKER TRAINING CUES

A “Marker” used in Dog Training as a System of Marker Training, is a way to communicate important information to the dog during training.  These “markers” or signals are very powerful when used correctly.

A “marker” can be auditory, visual, tactile, and can even be a smell.  Typically the two most common markers are the word “YES” or a “CLICKER.”  The other most common “marker” is “GOOD.”

The “marker” starts out with NO POWER.  In psychology and behaviorism, and when talking about learning theory and Operant Conditioning, the “marker” starts out as a neutral stimulus, meaning it has no value or no association.

REWARD MARKERS IN MARKER TRAINING

Marker Training Yes reward

Start with a typical “Reward Marker,” such as “Yes.”  Initially the word “Yes” means nothing to a dog.  However if we say “Yes” and then immediately give a food reward after saying yes, and we do this many times such as 50 times in a row, “yes” give a treat, “yes” give a treat, and keep repeating this over and over, the dog starts to learn that the word “Yes” signals to the dog that it will be getting a treat or food reward. by pairing the word “yes” with a treat every time in quick succession, the dog will now understand that “yes” means treat. 

Once the dog has been conditioned to the marker, (classical conditioning, or associative learning,) we can use the word “yes” to mark a desired behavior and that communicates to the dog immediately that the behavior gets a reward.

At this point, our marker has value once conditioned.  the food or the reward is the primary reinforcer.  The Marker Training marker word “yes” now is no longer a neutral stimulus but now is a conditioned stimulus.  The marker training marker word of “yes” becomes the conditioned reinforcer of the primary reinforcer, i.e., food.

That is the science behind marker training, but it is really simple.  We condition the dog that “yes” means treat by pairing the word “yes” with a treat many times until the dog knows that when we say “yes” a treat is coming.  “Yes” becomes the reward marker.  we say “yes” to mark the correct behavior and signal to the dog that it gets a treat for that behavior.

The advantage to using markers in training dogs is that marker training improves the clarity of communication between the dog and the dog owner or trainer.  Marker Training allows those who are training their dog to have great timing.

Timing is extremely important in dog training. Marker Training gives you an advantage in timing.  In dog training you have about zero to a half a second to pair a reward with the dog’s behavior for the dog to “connect the dots,” or understand that the treat was given because of the behavior. 

An example would be when perhaps we are teaching a dog to sit.  you have zero to a half a second to get the food reward in the dogs mouth once the dog sits.  Most Dog Owners and and many Dog Trainers are just not that fast.  If you don’t use a marker training system, you might be very late with the reward.  If you are late the dog will still like the reward, but the dog will have no idea that it was rewarded for the behavior it just did.  That’s right if you reward your dog two seconds after your dog sits, your dog will not associate the reward with the behavior.  TIMING IS EVERYTHING!

So far we have only been talking about a reward marker.  There are other markers we use in marker training when training dogs. Let’s look at some other markers that are typically used.

NO REWARD MARKER IN MARKER TRAINING

marker training no reward marker

A No Reward marker is exactly what it says.  in Marker Training a No Reward Marker signals to the dog that what it did is not correct and it will not be getting a reward.  I use the word “Ah Ah” in my dog training.  I have heard others use the word “Nope” or “No” as a No Reward Marker.

As with the Reward Marker “yes,” “Ah Ah” has no meaning or power until it is paired with or conditioned with something.  In this case it will be pared with the removal of a reward that the dog wants.  I condition the No Reward marker of “Ah Ah” by presenting food, and pull it away from the dog before the dog can get the food.  I say “Ah Ah” when pulling the food away. This also has to be done with great timing and with many repetitions in order for the dog to begin to understand that “Ah Ah” means it won’t get a reward, try again.  Once you have a conditioned No Reward Marker you can use this powerful marker to modify a dog’s behavior. 

KEEP GOING MARKER IN MARKER TRAINING

marker training keep going marker

Another marker I use in marker training is the word or marker, “Good.”  just like “yes” the word “Good” has no meaning and no value at all until paired with a reward many times until the dog associates “good” with getting a treat.” 

“Good” as a marker is used to signal or mark a behavior that we want the dog to keep doing.  The most used application for a Keep Going Marker in Marker Training is for duration of a “stay” command.  We say “Good” and give a treat to the dog who is maintaining a stay to reinforce that staying is what we want.

START TRAINING MARKER IN MARKER TRAINING

Marker Training Start Training Marker

Some trainers like to signal or mark to the dog that training is beginning.  Many do this by always saying “Ready” and getting the dog’s eye contact each and every time they start training.  This can be a great and powerful marker to signal to the dog that now is time to begin working.  

STOP TRAINING MARKER IN MARKER TRAINING

Marker Training Stop Training Marker

I like to signal to my dog when my dog is done training or done with a specific command or training exercise.  I use the stop training marker word of “Break” to signal or mark to my dog the end of training or exercise finished.

For example, let’s say my dog is on a Down Stay Command.  When I say “Break” my dog releases itself from the command and begins playtime.  Every time the dog is done, I say “Break” and I play with my dog.

Try Marker Training if you have never used markers.  for more information contact Phoenix Dog Training at (602) 769-1411


Crate Training

CRATE TRAINING

CRATE TRAINING

Crate Training

CRATE TRAINING IS A MUST

Crate Training is a must for a well behaved and well trained puppy or dog.  Crate Training is one of the first training steps for house breaking any puppy or older dog that you might have.  I will go through the steps to successful crate training in this article, and be sure to watch the Crate Training Video that is in this article to show you the steps of crate training as well.  If you find that you are struggling with crate training even after this article and accompanying video, please contact me at PHOENIX DOG TRAINING for personal one on one puppy training and dog training help in crate training your dog.

CRATE TRAINING BENEFITS

  •  CRATE TRAINING KEEPS YOUR PUPPY OR DOG SAFE
  •  CRATE TRAINING HELPS WITH POTTY TRAINING AND HOUSE BREAKING
  •  CRATE TRAINING PREVENTS DESTRUCTIVE BEHAVIOR
  •  CRATE TRAINING TEACHES PUPPIES AND DOGS SELF CONTROL
  •  CRATE TRAINING CAN GIVE YOU THE DOG OWNER A BREAK FROM HAVING TO SUPERVISE YOUR DOG OR PUPPY WHEN BUSY

There are many benefits to crate training a puppy or crate training an older dog.  if you need to potty train a puppy or house break an older dog, the number one rule is to supervise or crate.  dogs and puppies typically will not want to soil their crate and lay in urine or poo.

Crate Training prevents destructive behavior in that you always need to correct and redirect your dog or puppy for unwanted behaviors when you are not available to directly supervise your puppy or dogs behavior. This is very important when house breaking a puppy or dog.

If your puppy or dog gets away with going potty in the house without you seeing it or correcting it, your dog will learn that going potty in the house is ok because there is no consequence.  you have to supervise or crate a dog so there are no missed opportunities to teach and correct your dog what not to do and teach appropriate house manners.

Because it is so important to watch, supervise or crate a puppy or dog with bad house manners, potty training and house breaking issues, how fast your dog learns is often determined on you crating your puppy or dog when you are not available to watch them.

The dog crate is never to be used as a punishment or time out.  think of it as a baby crib.  you place a baby in a crib or a play crib to keep the baby safe when you are not right their with it.

TOOLS YOU WILL NEED TO FOR CRATE TRAINING

crate training wire cratecrate training plastic airline crate

A wire or metal crate or a plastic crate (size of crate should be as long as the puppy or dog is and not much larger.

 

clicker for crate trainingA dog training CLICKER (best) or the word “YES” to mark the correct behavior

 

dog training treat bagA dog training treat or food reward pouch or bag

 

 

10 STEPS TO CRATE TRAIN A PUPPY OR DOG IN JUST 5 MINUTES A DAY

STEP 1 Throw high value treats in the crate.  The dog will follow the food into the crate associating the behavior of going in the crate with receiving a food reward. We want the dog to find the experience of going in the crate rewarding

STEP 2 After doing step 1 several times then add the next step of starting to “mark” the behavior of going in the crate with a clicker using the principles of clicker training .  Make sure to click as the dog goes into the crate and before the dog gets the food reward you are throwing in the crate in step 1.

PUTTING STEP 1 AND STEP 2 TOGETHER MEANS

  1. Throw treat in the crate
  2. Dog or Puppy goes in crate
  3. Click to mark the behavior of the dog going in the crate
  4. Dog or Puppy eats the treat or food reward.

STEP 3 After you have practiced both steps 1 and step 2 together successfully then add the next step.  Step 3 is to add a “cue” or “command” “Kennel” when the dog goes into the crate to get the treat.  Be sure to say the “cue” or “command” of “Kennel” after you throw the treat in the crate.  This should happen immediately after you throw the treat into the crate but before you click the clicker to mark the behavior of the dog entering the crate.  In this step we are just labeling the behavior the dog is performing.  We are not giving a command we are capturing the behavior of the dog going into the crate and adding a label to what the dog is doing. We don’t ask for the behavior yet with a command of “kennel,” we are just making the association of the word “kennel” with going in the crate several times.

PUTTING STEPS 1, 2, AND 3 ALL TOGETHER MEANS

  1. Throw treat in crate
  2. Say “kennel” as the dog first begins to move into the crate (remember we are not commanding “kennel” yet we are just saying the word “kennel” as the dog goes into the crate to follow and get the treat)
  3. Click and mark the behavior with the clicker of the dog going into the crate
  4. Dog eats the treat and is rewarded in the crate.

STEP 4 Begin to now ask for the behavior first by giving the cue or command “kennel” before you throw a treat into the crate.  Use your treat hand to point into the crate rather than throwing the treat first, or pretend to throw the treat into the crate.  If you spent enough time in steps 1,2, and 3, before moving on to step 4, your dog should now go into the crate when you give the command or cue “kennel” while you point the treat hand into the crate as if you had a treat and pretend you are pointing and throwing a treat into the crate. At this point in the training you are withholding the treat until the dog goes into the crate with the cue or command of “kennel” along with the hand pointing inside the crate. At this point you will reward the dog with the food only after you have given the cue or command of “kennel” and after the dog has gone into the crate and after you have marked that behavior with the clicker.  The treat is given to the dog from your hand now after the click.

STEP 5 Close the crate door before marking the behavior for the dog.  once the dog has gone into the crate on command or cue of ‘kennel” now close the door of the crate, then click and treat the dog. (Now the dog has to wait for the crate door to close before the click and treat happen.)  Click and treat several times for the dog being in the crate with the crate door closed.  You are now marking with the clicker and rewarding brief duration of the dog being in the crate for a brief time with the crate door closed.  This is part of preventing Separation Anxiety for dogs and puppies when in a crate.

STEP 6 Teach the puppy or dog to wait in the crate even when the door is open.  We are now opening and closing the crate door with the dog inside and teaching “kennel” as an implied stay.  We are clicking and rewarding the dog with treats when the dog does not come out of the crate even if we open the crate door.  If your dog or puppy tries to move out of the crate when you open the door, immediately close the crate door pushing the dog back into the crate while re- commanding “kennel.”  When you open the crate door if the dog stays click and reward the implied stay in the crate.

STEP 7 Click and treat the dog or puppy for not coming out of the crate when the door is open.  do this fast and often in the beginning.  YOU WANT TO CLICK AND TREAT OFTEN WHEN THE DOG IS IN THE CRATE WITH THE DOOR OPEN. If the dog tries to get out of the crate right as you click, do not dive the treat.  We don’t want to accidentally reward the behavior of coming out of the crate when we are trying to now teach this as an implied stay until released from the “kennel” command or cue. Remember if the dog tries to come out of the crate without permission, block the puppy or dog with the crate door from coming out, then try to slowly open the crate again.

STEP 8 Teach a release command or cue of “OK,” “Free,” or “Break.”  When teaching the dog the release command or cue, you will give the cue or command you pick, in this case “OK’ as this is what I use in the above video tutorial for crate training. Often you will need to help your dog to understand what the release command or cue is and what it means by helping the dog out of the crate and then marking that behavior with the clicker and then reward. Practice only letting your puppy or dog exit the crate when hearing the command or cue of “OK’ signaling it is OK to come out of the crate.

STEP 9 Add distance and duration (time), step outside briefly.  Come back in, click and reward for the duration and distance, also click and reward when you open the crate door and the puppy or dog stays in the crate.  In addition to crate training you are teaching the implied stay and you are beginning the process of desensitizing any possible separation anxiety that some puppies and dogs experience with crate training and being left in a crate for a period of time. When first starting out, only leave the house for a minute or two.  Gradually over 30 days increase your time away from 15-30 minutes.  Add a minute or two a day more duration while training until you have successfully  been able to train your puppy or dog to be in the crate calmly for 15-30 minutes.  MOST DOGS THAT CAN BE TRAINED TO BE IN A CRATE FOR 15 MINUTES WITHOUT BEING UPSET DO NOT DEVELOP SEPARATION ANXIETY.

STEP 10 Keep your puppy or dog calm when you come home by practicing the dog or puppy staying in the crate until it is calm and here the release command or cue of “OK.”  If your puppy or dog is more sensitive and prone to more anxiety when crated or left alone, begin to place your puppy’s or dog’s water bowl and food bowl in the crate along with your puppy or dog’s favorite toys.  this will further help to prevent and desensitize any potential anxiety.

Remember Practice Makes Permanent!  No one is Perfect!  Practice this 5 minutes a day and your puppy or dog will be crate trained in no time.  Review the Crate Training Video for further help.

Be sure to also check out our article on How to Potty Train a Puppy.

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Phoenix Dog Trainer Operant condition dog behavior science of how dogs are trained

HOW DOGS LEARN

HOW DOGS LEARN

OPERANT CONDITIONING THE SCIENCE BEHIND DOG TRAINING: HOW DOGS LEARN AND ARE TRAINED

how dogs learn operant conditioningHow dogs learn might be the most important question you could ask.  At Phoenix Dog Training, our  approach to dog obedience training is based on years of study. As one of the foremost students of dog behavior, our Phoenix Dog Behaviorist has seen firsthand the effect of a combination of Operant Conditioning, Positive Reinforcement and Negative Reinforcement, and has made these techniques the centerpieces of his training philosophy, which specializes in the elimination of aggression, fears, anxieties and phobias in dogs.

HOW DOGS LEARN 

At Phoenix Dog Training we use about 90% positive reinforcement and about 10% negative reinforcement.  I also use negative punishment which is the removal of something the dog wants to decrease or stop unwanted behavior.  An example of negative punishment is to take away your kids WiFi password until they do their homework.  You are trying to stop or decrease the child’s procrastination.  With a dog it might be removing a treat or a toy.  This is one of the many ways how dogs learn.

I personally do not use positive punishment because I do not believe that how dogs learn has to be to experience fear, pain and intimidation to be taught. But I do use negative reinforcement, but in a unique way.

This being the case, Here at Phoenix Dog Training we are always eager to counteract the flashing red lights some people see when they hear the word “negative reinforcement.” Don’t let the term scare you, because in truth it isn’t negative at all! In fact it is non-aversive, as we don’t believe any dog should be trained with fear, pain or intimidation. As an example consider the following:

  • I am walking a dog and want to turn right
  • The dog wants to continue going straight
  • I tap the dog on the shoulder to get its attention so it can turn with me
  • I stop tapping on the dog’s shoulder when the dog performs the wanted behavior.

HOW DOGS LEARN 

That is all there is to negative reinforcement!  People often confuse negative reinforcement with punishment.  the two are not the same.  Negative reinforcement increases and or strengthens behavior.  Punishment stops or decreases a behavior.

Traditionally, how dogs learn and the use of negative reinforcement has been to apply an unpleasant stimulus to the dog, and then help the dog to do the behavior in order to remove the unpleasantness.  The dog works to turn off the unpleasant stimulus, or to avoid it all together.  Different trainers will use negative reinforcement differently.  How unpleasant the stimulus is varies from trainer to trainer.

My experience and work with how dogs learn has shown me that negative reinforcement really does not need to be a true aversive.  To me when I think aversive, I think pain or unpleasant.  In fact, here is the dictionary definition of aversive:

” aversive. adjective. Causing avoidance of a thing, situation, or behavior by using an unpleasant or punishing stimulus, as in techniques of behavior modification.”

I have personally developed a system based on how dogs learn and the use of negative reinforcement that uses a non aversive tactile or touch sensation that is nuetral.  The tactile or touch sensation is not unpleasent, demonstrated by the dog’s behavior, there is no avoidance.  The tactile or touch stimulus becomes a tactile cue, prompt, or command that is paired with both auditory and visual cues, adding another layer of communication to both verbal commands and hand signals.  I use multiple modalities of communication with dogs for more complete understanding and clarity of communication. 

What the dog experiences is very light non aversive tapping on its neck while being given a verbal command along with a visual command (hand signal.) When the dog does the behavior, the light tapping stops.  Rather than being an aversive, it is neutral touch, or a non painful tactile touch.

I have seen mothers speaking to their children who did not respond to them, touch the child on the shoulder to get the child’s attention with light touch and to get them to follow through on what the mother was asking.  That is non aversive negative reinforcement.

Another example of non aversive negative reinforcement that people experience is the seat-belt indicator.  If you don’t put your seat-belt on, there will be a sound going off or a light going off until you fasten the belt.  Once you do the behavior, the sound goes away.  There was no pain, at most it was an annoyance.  

HOW DOGS LEARN 

There are total positive reinforcement only trainers that can not conceive of non aversive negative reinforcement.  They like to say their way of training is scientific, but they fail to discuss ALL of the science.  The total positive reinforcement trainers want to claim how dogs learn is only with positive reinforcement.  They refuse to correct a dog. One of the reasons they can not conceive of non aversive humane negative reinforcement is because they have ZERO experience with it. They are giving their opinion on something that they have never done.

By combining all of the aforementioned aspects of how dogs learn, Phoenix Dog Training Dog Trainers are able to make their intentions clear to puppies and dogs. By opening the lines of communication Phoenix Dog Training is able to provide a low stress atmosphere for puppy training and canine training while getting lasting results in a fraction of the time of other Phoenix dog trainers.

We are committed to how dogs learn and providing dog training in Phoenix that offer the least amount of stress and the quickest results. Remember, we are training you as well as your dog, and the knowledge and insight you’ll gain into your dog’s mind and regarding the techniques with which to communicate your wishes will result in lasting good behavior and a more balanced home life. 

Thanks for reading and hopefully you have learned a little something about how dogs learn.

Phoenix Dog Training are the best dog trainers we have found in the Phoenix/Scottsdale area. Their Dog Behaviorist has personally helped us with our dogs as we had a tough case. Our dogs are doing great and we would never go to anyone else to train our dogs. The people, service and knowledge of training dogs is the best we have seen by far! I would recommend them to all my friends and family! Thank you!– Greg and Jody Fossen


dog board and train phoenix

BOARD AND TRAIN IN PHOENIX

BOARD AND TRAIN IN PHOENIX AZ

Board and Train in Phoenix AZ Dog Training

 

PHOENIX DOG TRAINING was one of the first dog training companies in Phoenix Arizona to offer a Board and Train in Phoenix AZ. Back decades ago, I actually coined the term “Dog Boot Camp” for Board and Train type Dog Obedience Training. There has been a great deal of popularity in the dog training field to do what is called Dog Board and Train programs. Some might refer to these Dog Board and Train programs as Dog Boot Camp or Dogie Boot Camp.

There are basically 2 kinds of dog training programs that fit the definition of “Board and Train in Phoenix AZ.’

(1) Kennel based Board and Train in Phoenix AZ and

(2) In the Dog Trainer’s home for Board and Train in Phoenix AZ.

DOG BOARD AND TRAIN IN PHOENIX DOG TRAINING PROGRAMS SHOULD BE THE LAST OPTION

Dog Board and Train Dog Training Programs sound really great, but there can be many problems with this type of training, and sending your dog away for training.

WARNING: DOG BOARD AND TRAIN IN PHOENIX AZ BENEFITS THE DOG TRAINERS POCKETBOOK RATHER THAN HAVE YOUR DOG’S BEST INTEREST AT HEART.

Board and Train in Phoenix

Kennel Based Dog Board and Train is the worst!  Dog Training should happen at the home of the dog where the dogs training and behavior problems exist.  The best place for dog obedience training is at your home with in-home dog training working one on one with a dog trainer or dog behaviorist.

Most dog behavior problems will not be fixed in a kennel.  A kennel is nothing like the inside of a home, much less the inside of your home.  So if your dog needs potty training, is destructive and or hyper in the home, along with having other in home bad behaviors, there is a less that 30% chance they will ever get addressed because your dog is not able to misbehave in a kennel.  There is nothing to get into trouble in the kennel.

Most dog training kennels have many dogs, most with bad behavior, making your dog all the more freaked out and stressed being away from you, your home and everything that id familiar and feels like home.

Sending your dog to a kennel Board and Train in Phoenix AZ also means you subject your dog to illness and disease from other animals, a possible dog attack, and less than optimal living conditions.  One popular dog training company in Cave Creek Arizona even had 28 dogs die at their facility not too long ago. There are dangers with board and train

Dogs that are trained in a kennel based Board and Train program tend to revert back to their old behaviors within 3 weeks of returning home.  In some cases the behaviors are back as soon as the dog comes home.

 IN THE DOG TRAINER’S HOME FOR BOARD AND TRAIN IN PHOENIX AZ

Board and Train in Phoenix AZ Dog Training

 If you absolutely can not do in-home dog training with private dog training lessons, or dog obedience classes with your dog, you could opt for a Dog Board and Train in Phoenix program where the dog trainer takes your dog into their own personal home and have your dog stay with the dog trainer in their home like they are a member of the dog trainers own family.

The ONLY way the Phoenix Dog Training does any Dog Board and Train in Phoenix AZ is the type where your dog will live in my home with me as a member of my household.

Phoenix Dog training ONLY takes in ONE dog at a time to make sure your dog is getting the non stop 24/7 dog training and care you are paying for.   Always stay away from any kennel based board and train and go with the type of board and train program where your dog lives in a real home where real in home problems can be addressed.

Phoenix Dog Training only takes one dog at a time when and if we do a Dog Board and Train program typically we need one to two months advanced notice to check to see if we have availability.

Call PHOENIX DOG TRAINING at (602) 769-1411

Copyright Phoenix Dog Training 3724 E. Morrow Dr. Phoenix AZ. 85050


Dog Obedience Classes Phoenix Arizona

DOG OBEDIENCE CLASSES

DOG OBEDIENCE CLASSES

Dog Training Phoenix

Dog Obedience Classes, are they right for your dog? Dog Obedience Classes,  did you know this is the worst way to train your dog?

Dog Obedience Classes are typically the worst way to train your dog. Imagine a dog obedience class that has say 8 dogs with little to no training. Now imagine that those same dog obedience classes have say 8 unskilled and untrained owners. What you end up with typically are dog obedience classes that are an hour long of chaos and distractions with very little learning taking place.

About 70% of the dogs we train here at Phoenix Dog Training have been to previous dog obedience classes. What I typically here from clients is, “We went to a pet chain store for group training. “Fido” still wont listen, especially when there are distractions and things in the environment are excitable. When new people come over to the house, the dog is hyper and jumping and wont listen. I hear that there dog pulls like crazy on the leash, or is reactive towards other dogs or aggressive on leash.

WHY DOG OBEDIENCE CLASSES OFTEN ARE THE WORST PLACE TO TRAIN YOUR DOG

Many dogs after attending dog obedience classes have behavior problems at home that have never been fully addressed and corrected like: stopping a dog from jumping, how to potty train a dog, stopping unwanted dog barking, preventing and correcting dogs from chewing destructively, how to stop puppy biting, how to crate train a puppy or a dog; the list can go on forever with any dog behavior problems that are specific to your dog’s home and your dog’s yard and neighborhood.

Every professional dog trainer knows that the best way to train a dog is with private in-home dog training at your home where you and your dog live. This is where the problems are happening. At home is where the training for your dog needs to be. Dogs learn new behaviors best when taught with lots of positive reinforcement and in the beginning in a place where your dog can be trained with little to no distractions.

DOG OBEDIENCE CLASSES TRAIN DOGS BACKWARDS BY HAVING DISTRACTIONS COME FIRST

There are three main phases in dog training. A professional dog trainer will teach you that the three phases of dog training are:

  1. The learning or teaching phase of dog training
  2. The correction phase of dog training, and
  3. The distraction proofing phase of dog training

There should be little to know distractions in the first phase of dog training when first training your dog for the first time new behaviors, or what to do.   By their very nature dog obedience classes are inherently very distracting.

First, you and your dog are doing dog training in an environment and a location that is completely new and novel. Second, you have all kinds of new people, new dogs, not just one, but many, all having the same experience. Dog obedience classes are way too distracting to start training your dog in a group dog training class. The distraction phase of dog training comes last in dog training, not first. All professional dog trainers know this, but many offer group dog training classes in Phoenix because it is very profitable to have the group volume of business.

GROUP DOG OBEDIENCE CLASSES SHOULD HAPPEN LAST FOR POLISHING AND MAINTENANCE

Group dog obedience classes should happen last for polishing and maintenance of the dog training that you and your dog trainer worked on when doing private in-home dog training.

Here at Phoenix Dog Training, we offer Polishing and Maintenance Dog Obedience Classes. These group dog training classes are with dogs that have already had professional dog training at home with one of our Phoenix Dog Trainers. The benefit of having group dog training classes after previously private dog training lessons, are many. First all the dogs in our Phoenix dog obedience classes are trained and under control. These dogs have a strong foundation in dog obedience training while working with our Phoenix dog trainer at your home. Second, all the dog owners and dog handlers in the group dog obedience classes now have skills working with and training their dogs.

PHOENIX DOG TRAINING GROUP DOG OBEDIENCE CLASSES ARE UNIQUE

At Phoenix Dog Training, our group dog obedience classes take the dog training you and your dog learned at home with private dog training, and our Professional Dog Trainer, and take it to the next level with an insane amount of distraction proofing in dog training. Phoenix Dog Training provides the best of both worlds. Our Dog Training Company and Professional Dog Trainers believe a dog is not trained until the dog can listen and until your dog can behave when its crazy, when all heck breaks loose as far as excitement and distraction. If you want a reliable dog then your dog must be able to listen to your dog training commands even in the craziest of distractions. While you can definitely get the distraction in group dog obedience classes, you will not have the reliability and control that private dog training at home will provide you, then following up to polish your dog training skills and maintain your dogs training.

Written by Phoenix Dog Training. If you have a dog or a puppy in need of dog training or puppy training you can contact us at;

Company Name: PHOENIX DOG TRAINING

Address: 3724 E. Morrow Dr., Phoenix, Az. 85050

Phone: 602-769-1411

Email: info@phoenixdogtraining.com

Web: https://phoenixdogtraining.com

 

 


Canine Body Language Dog Training

Canine Body Language-Dog Aggression-Dog Anxiety

Canine Body Language For Dog Aggression and Fearful Dog Training

Phoenix Dog Aggrssion Trainers“Understanding Canine Body Language is critical to helping modify fearful and aggressive behavior,” states, Harvard Animal Behaviorist and Director of Dog Training Phoenix.  Here are bullet points and a crash course in understanding what calming and stress signals are.

Canine Body Language Signs of stress or arousal – taken in context and happen together or in groups. None of these happen in a vacuum.

 

  • Yawning Dog Training Phoenix Canine Body Language
  • Penis crowning – often around food or resources (can be toy, place or person), Stress is an arousal level. Sequence that leads to aggression. No female equivalent.
  • Teeth chattering – sign of arousal, sign of frustration or aggression. Can happen when excited to play.
  • Sweaty paws
  • Lip licking – happens in succession, sign of stress which is different than when hungry or after a meal. Repeated multiple times.
  • Stress vocalization – whining, dry shallow cough or part of high pitched, trill sound, dry pant
  • Tails – mean nothing, except when curled under body which is sign of stress. Must look at breed to know what normal tail looks like in order to tell if a sign
  • Chuffing – usually see in boxers. Cheek puffing or a blowing sound coming from mouth.
  • Dilated pupils – must be taken in contest of lighting in the room. Look for soft eyes with dilated pupils. “Whale eye” eye is dilated, hard can see a sliver of white in eye, usually followed by a bite. Whole body goes stiff and still, then Whale eye then bite.
  • Not eating – first signal that dog is in stress and should be alerted. If try to give a treat they don’t take it.
  • Urination – submissive urination, or marking of territory. They urinate on all things, including people, resources to feel comfortable.
  • Ears pinned back – again subject to breed of dog. “Bunny ears”.
  • Freezes – watch mouth. Body goes stiff, hard eyes, ears can go back/down along head, very still, mouth starts to close very slowly. Bite usually follows. This happens with a bunch of other stress. Lots of energy coming from animal.
  • Pacing – different than being interested in something. They quickly walk back and forth. Lots of energy being expelled by animal. Doesn’t have to be in a pattern, can be all over the place. Other stress signals accompany this like stiff body, vocalization, dilated pupils, pulling on lead.
  • Slow of little movement – looks like a lump. Non stressed dogs move around.
  • Stiff posture – excessive shedding. Example of this happening is when dog goes to vet.
  • Stretching – not normal I’ve just gotten up and need to stretch my bones/muscles, but happens in a sequence with other stress.
  • Trembling
  • Muscle ridge – hard to see but can watch it happen around top of orbital eye bone and at top of mouth.
  • Urogenital check out – during or just after a time of stress, dog will make sure all of the private parts are still there.
  • Excessive salivation – depending on breed or what is happening. Can happen in arousal state like waiting for food so must be taken in context. Part of other stressors.
  • Shallow or fast breathing – looks like holding breath and must be taken in context with environment

Canine Body Language Calming signals/appeasement signals/non-aggressive intent – Offer and acceptance signals Canine Body Language Dog Training Phoenix Teaches To Help Train Out Dog Aggression and Dog Anxiety

  • Look away – an active turn of head. Chin up and turn your head. Can be used for having dog not jump.
  • Paw raises – can be done either standing or sitting. I mean you no harm.
  • Sniffing – an area after a prolonged period in that area
  • Sneezing – really likes what you are doing, like training and they get so excited then sneeze in succession
  • Scratching – must be taken in context
  • Blinking – to calm themselves or others. We can use to show them we mean no harm
  • Shake off – most common calming signal. Can start at backside and goes all the way off. Very animated when it happens.

Canine Body Language Both calming and stress signals

  • Yawning
  • Lip/nose licking
  • Sitting or lying down
  • Pacing in an arc

Canine Body Language Distance increasing signals – back off, social distance, sub threshold that means you must intervene, read these signals before aggression begins.

  • Marking territory
  • Hard eyes – sharp line between pupil and iris
  • Showing teeth – C shape, molars not showing, antagonistic pucker, full frontal lip curl
  • Ears alert and forward – depends on breed
  • Tense body or face
  • Height posture height seeking – very significant, muzzle punch
  • Lowered head and neck
  • Excessive barking – low and fast. Not like the “you’re home” high pitched fast yipping bark or the alarm barking.

If you have a fearful or aggressive dog contact Phoenix Dog Training and Harvard Educated Dog Behaviorist for help Now toll free (602) 769-1411

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How to teach a dog to stay video by Phoenix Dog Training

HOW TO TEACH A DOG TO STAY VIDEO

HOW TO TEACH A DOG TO STAY VIDEO

I get asked all the time How to teach a Dog to Stay. Dog owners tell me they can get their dog to sit and their dog might stay, but their dog will not stay when there are distractions. The times when you need your dog to stay is when there are distractions.

  • Does your dog stay when there are heavy distractions?  
  • Will your dog run off or stop listening when there are a lot of distractions?  
  • Is your dog safe in a down stay command around traffic, children or other animals?
  • Will your dog maintain a down stay command when there is a lot of excitement and chaos going on in the environment?    

If you answered no to any of these questions this dog training video, “How to Teach a Dog to Stay” is a must see dog training video.

HOW TO TEACH A DOG TO STAY STARTS WITH THE DOWN COMMAND

Call Now For Dog Training Help (602) 769-1411

A dog will always be more reliable in a stay command if the dog is commanded to stay when laying down.  I watch people start to teach stay from a sit command and I always tell them it is a mistake to start to teach stay from sit.  when a dog is in the down position they are more committed to stay by the nature of their body position and posture.

Start teaching the stay when the dog is in the down command or down position.  If your dog is standing or if your dog is sitting your dog is less likely to stay when there is a distraction.  To start to learn how to teach your dog to stay, we always make it the easiest and most successful for the dog and owner to succeed.  Starting to teach your dog to stay is best started in the down position.  

Once the dog can stay in a down command with heavy distractions, teaching your dog to stay in a sit command or to stay while standing is easy.  All the hard work and foundation work on how to teach a dog to stay is done from the down command.

NEVER SAY THE WORD STAY!

How to teach a dog to stay

CALL NOW FOR DOG TRAINING HELP (602) 769-1411

In the training programs for Phoenix Dog Training we never say the word or say the command “stay.”  “Stay” is a useless and unnecessary word and command. at Phoenix Dog Training all of our Phoenix Dog Trainers teach three commands as AUTOMATIC IMPLIED STAY COMMANDS.  The three commands that are taught at Phoenix Dog Obedience Training that are automatic implied stay commands are “Down,” “Place,” and “Sit.” “Sit” means to sit and stay, “Place” means to go to your place and stay.  “Down” means get in the down position and stay laying down.

How to teach a dog to stay does not happen with the words we use or the commands we use.  How to teach a dog to stay happens as a result of teaching a dog that staying with distractions has value for the dog in the form of a high value reward.

  • If you ask your dog to sit and stay, and your dog breaks from the stay command what would you tell your dog next?
  • If you ask your dog to go down and stay, and your dog stands up or walks away, what would you tell your dog next?
  • If you asked your dog to down and stay and your dog does not, do you say down again?  Do you say stay again?  Do you say down and stay again?  Do you say NO?

GIVE ONLY ONE COMMAND 

Phoenix Dog Training how to teach a dog to stay

CALL NOW FOR DOG TRAINING HELP (602) 769-1411

Dogs think and learn in “black and white” terms.  Keep it simple and keep it consistent. In how to teach a dog to stay, use only one word for stay.  The one word to use for stay should be “Down.” “Place,” and “Sit.” Why would you want your dog to do anything else then what you just asked your dog to do?  If I command my dog, “down,” I expect my dog to be down.  If my dog gets up, my dog broke the “down” command.  What is clearest to the dog is to re command “Down.” Down was what was commanded.  Down was what is wanted.  When Down does not happen re command Down.

The dog obedience commands of “Down,” “Place,” and “Sit,” ARE ALL STATIONARY COMMANDS to begin with.  The use of the word or command stay with one of these three stationary non movement commands is redundant, unnecessary, and only adds to confusion when learning how to teach a dog to stay. 

RE COMMAND THE LAST RIGHT BEHAVIOR

Dog Training Phoenix how to teach a dog to stay

 

  1. When learning how to teach a dog to stay your job is to give a command that is stationary by nature such as the “Down” command.
  2.  The next step is to keep the dog in the “Down” command and reward with positive reinforcement the correct behavior of down.  
  3. The third step is to re command “Down” anytime your dog stops the down command and behavior.

CREATE DISTRACTIONS AND REWARD CORRECT BEHAVIOR

When learning how to teach a dog to stay, the behavior is learned by creating distractions and rewarding the dog with positive reinforcement for not taking the bait of the distraction and maintaining the stationary command.  The behavior of staying when there are distractions is shaped by presenting the bait of a distraction and rewarding the dog if it does not take the bait.  The behavior of staying when there are distractions is also shaped by re commanding the behavior when the dog does take the bait.

HOW TO TEACH A DOG TO STAY HAPPENS FAST WHEN YOU COMMUNICATE IN A WAY THAT MATCHES AND MIRRORS THE WAY YOUR DOG THINKS AND PROCESSES INFORMATION.

Dog Trainer Phoenix how to teach a dog to stay

CALL NOW FOR DOG TRAINING HELP (602) 769-1411

We have often heard that “communication is key.”  When communication is clear, precise, and can be predictive as to a certain pattern, you are “speaking dog!”  Dogs are dialectical in nature.  Dogs learn by classical conditioning and by operant conditioning.  

Classical conditioning happens when two things are paired or bridged together.  An example of classical conditioning is when your cell phone rings you answer it.  The behavior of answering your phone when it rings is learned because the phone ringing has been paired with answering your phone. The timing has to be just right to make the connection between two or more things when they are being paired.  for the example of learning how to teach a dog to stay, the word or command down and the behavior of going down are paired and matched.  the dog learns with the repetitive timing of the word down with the behavior of down, what “Down” means.

Operant conditioning is basically the use of well timed rewards and consequences to shape behavior to increase or decrease.  Behaviors that are rewarded increase.  Behaviors that have consequences decrease.  An example of Operant conditioning in the “Down” as an implied stay training exercise is when the dog gets a high value food reward for staying in the down position when their are distractions.  Another example is when there is the consequence of not getting a food reward, and getting some leash pressure and re command into “Down.” 

With well timed rewards and consequences and very “black and white” communication even difficult behaviors like how to stay when there are insane distractions can be taught with relative ease.

how to teach a dog to stay service dog training

If you are struggling with having your dog listen, pay attention, be obedient and respond to commands, Give Phoenix Dog Training a Call today at (602) 769-1411

 

 

 


Keri Grunert
Keri Grunert
05:11 18 Jan 18
Phoenix Dog Training is Phenomenal!! From the very beginning we knew we were in good hands. They worked so well with our whole family. Getting the kids involved in the training was brilliant. We would definitely recommend this company.
Tyler Thompson
Tyler Thompson
15:37 30 Nov 17
I recently called Phoenix dog training to train my out of control hyper Australian Shepherd. The training was excellent and the service was A+ all the way. I have used two trainers before that could not help with the pulling on walks when any dog came by and jumping on guests. Now "Molly" knows to go to her "Place" when the door bell rings. Walks are now enjoyable. I can even take her off leash and she stays right with me. I can not thank you enough.Tyler Thompson
Jose Rivas
Jose Rivas
21:11 25 Jul 17
My wife and I highly recommend Phoenix Dog Training. Our dog, a Labrador Retriever/German Shepard Mix, (Mr. Pickles) was trained last summer and we could not be more happy with the results. Mr. Pickles has been an excellent dog ever since his training. Everyone that comes in contact with our dog is amazed by his obedience and uncanny maturity even though he is not even three years old. He has acted perfectly on an international flight in-cabin, in the grocery store, restaurants and practically any situation one can imagine. My wife and I have Phoenix Dog Training to thank for training our dog to be the most well behaved dog we have ever seen or met. Phoenix Dog Training understands dog behavior and knows how to train a dog to meet the needs of their owners. Phoenix Dog Training utilizes empathetic, efficient, and effective methodologies in training dogs and we give them an emphatic recommendation!
Charles F Frost
Charles F Frost
20:30 21 Sep 17
I was referred to Phoenix Dog Training by our Veterinarian because of our Boxer Max, and his aggression.Phoenix Dog Training and their Harvard schooled Animal Behaviorist did an incredible job helping myself and my family bring Max under control. We realize we will need to manage Max's behavior for as long as he is with us, but now we have the skills and the tools to keep Max and everyone happy and safe. Thank you for all the great training help and support with our dog Max.
The German Star Lord
The German Star Lord
06:53 20 Sep 17
I have always trained all of my dogs myself. I have never had a dog I could not train. My current dog Jasper is the exception. I truly thought my dog had a mental problem. Thanks to Phoenix Dog Training I no longer think Jasper is mental. Jasper just needed his owner trained. I would recommend Phoenix Dog Training to anyone needing professional dog training.
B B
B B
03:45 17 Sep 17
I am so grateful I found Phoenix Dog Training. I live up in North Scottsdale and have a large yard. We get a lot of wild animals that come onto our property. Coyotes, Havelina, Bob Cats Mountain Lion, you name it. The problem I was having was my dog Skip would not come when called. No matter what we did he would not come when called. He would call me when there were no distractions. He would come when nothing was going on. But up another dog or another person or another animal is there, he will not come for anything! I have tried several other dog trainers in Scottsdale. They all promised me they could get my dog to come, and they did a great job getting my dog to listen to me when there were no distractions. But if there's another animal, they were not able to get my dog to come when called. Out of frustration and skeptical, I called Phoenix dog training. They said they had a money back guarantee. I figured if there was ever a time they would have to honor their money back guarantee it would be with myself and my dog Skip. To my absolute amazement, the dog trainer from Phoenix Dog Training was able to get Skip to come with the distraction of another dog he brought with him within about 3 minutes! It was absolutely crazy!!! No one had been able to produce any results, and here they have skip coming when called with another dog around, skip would normally go crazy. But this time he was coming when called! I would definitely recommend Phoenix Dog Training!!! They saved my dog from being eaten from a Mountain Lion I'm sure!!!
Paras Dhankecha
Paras Dhankecha
06:03 19 Sep 17
I really want to thank you guys. Phoenix Dog Training has made my dogs life and my life so much better. I get to finally enjoy my dog. Walks are now a pleasure. She sits and stays when I tell her. When I call her to me, now she comes. I love the "place" command and that seems to be her favorite command too. I'm looking forward to the Polishing and Maintenance classes that Phoenix Dog Training offers after our completion of our private at home dog training lessons. Thank you again.
Numb Brrr
Numb Brrr
21:45 20 Sep 17
Phoenix Dog Training is AMAZING! They rehabilitated my aggressive PitBull when 3 other trainers failed and told me the only option was to euthanize my dog. Boy am I glad I did not listen to the other trainers and hired a real Dog Behaviorist. It is very different working with a professional Dog Behaviorist than just a Dog Trainer. It was worth the money and the time to save my dogs life. Definitely hire Phoenix Dog Training.
Linda Shoemaker
Linda Shoemaker
00:20 23 May 18
My husband, our Great Dane Misty, and I are so glad we signed up for training. We so appreciate all the training we received to help us better manage our girl. So much better but still a ways to go and now we have the knowledge and help we needed. We also know that anytime we have a question or issue that Bill will be there to help. Highly recommend. Jack, Linda, and Misty Shoemaker
Melinda McClean
Melinda McClean
01:12 05 Jun 18
My wife and I are more than happy with the work that Bill did for us, and our dog. We reached out to him for one-on-one training, frustrated and concerned about her reactive behavior. His knowledge of dog behavior is extensive, and his ability to impart that knowledge was exceptional. We learned more in one day, than we did in 6 months of group training with another organisation. Bill guided us through the training, and explained how we should progress through to maintenance, so that our dog's progress could continue. We've received many positive comments about our dog's improved behavior and we highly recommend Bill. He's given us the knowledge and confidence that we need to work with our dog.
Amanda Szolnok
Amanda Szolnok
18:18 27 Aug 18
I greatly appreciate Bill's help and support as my dog was going through some severe separation anxiety (barking loudly and whining anytime I left) after moving to a new apartment. I tried many different tips from multiple articles that I read online but nothing seemed to help. His barking was very loud for an apartment complex so I would need to keep him in doggy day care during the day while I worked as he couldn't be left alone in the apartment due to the noise level. It was a brand new behavior for my dog and I was pretty lost as to what steps to take. It seemed like a hopeless situation however Bill was very helpful and provided great insight and guidance in the situation. My dog is now doing great and is fine to be left alone while I go to work. He is very comfortable in the apartment and is back to being happy and playful. I really appreciate Phoenix Dog Training.
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