HOW TO TEACH A DOG TO STAY VIDEO

  • 0
How to teach a dog to stay video by Phoenix Dog Training

HOW TO TEACH A DOG TO STAY VIDEO

HOW TO TEACH A DOG TO STAY VIDEO

I get asked all the time How to teach a Dog to Stay. Dog owners tell me they can get their dog to sit and their dog might stay, but their dog will not stay when there are distractions. The times when you need your dog to stay is when there are distractions.

  • Does your dog stay when there are heavy distractions?  
  • Will your dog run off or stop listening when there are a lot of distractions?  
  • Is your dog safe in a down stay command around traffic, children or other animals?
  • Will your dog maintain a down stay command when there is a lot of excitement and chaos going on in the environment?    

If you answered no to any of these questions this dog training video, “How to Teach a Dog to Stay” is a must see dog training video.

HOW TO TEACH A DOG TO STAY STARTS WITH THE DOWN COMMAND

Call Now For Dog Training Help (602) 769-1411

A dog will always be more reliable in a stay command if the dog is commanded to stay when laying down.  I watch people start to teach stay from a sit command and I always tell them it is a mistake to start to teach stay from sit.  when a dog is in the down position they are more committed to stay by the nature of their body position and posture.

Start teaching the stay when the dog is in the down command or down position.  If your dog is standing or if your dog is sitting your dog is less likely to stay when there is a distraction.  To start to learn how to teach your dog to stay, we always make it the easiest and most successful for the dog and owner to succeed.  Starting to teach your dog to stay is best started in the down position.  

Once the dog can stay in a down command with heavy distractions, teaching your dog to stay in a sit command or to stay while standing is easy.  All the hard work and foundation work on how to teach a dog to stay is done from the down command.

NEVER SAY THE WORD STAY!

How to teach a dog to stay

CALL NOW FOR DOG TRAINING HELP (602) 769-1411

In the training programs for Phoenix Dog Training we never say the word or say the command “stay.”  “Stay” is a useless and unnecessary word and command. at Phoenix Dog Training all of our Phoenix Dog Trainers teach three commands as AUTOMATIC IMPLIED STAY COMMANDS.  The three commands that are taught at Phoenix Dog Obedience Training that are automatic implied stay commands are “Down,” “Place,” and “Sit.” “Sit” means to sit and stay, “Place” means to go to your place and stay.  “Down” means get in the down position and stay laying down.

How to teach a dog to stay does not happen with the words we use or the commands we use.  How to teach a dog to stay happens as a result of teaching a dog that staying with distractions has value for the dog in the form of a high value reward.

  • If you ask your dog to sit and stay, and your dog breaks from the stay command what would you tell your dog next?
  • If you ask your dog to go down and stay, and your dog stands up or walks away, what would you tell your dog next?
  • If you asked your dog to down and stay and your dog does not, do you say down again?  Do you say stay again?  Do you say down and stay again?  Do you say NO?

GIVE ONLY ONE COMMAND 

Phoenix Dog Training how to teach a dog to stay

CALL NOW FOR DOG TRAINING HELP (602) 769-1411

Dogs think and learn in “black and white” terms.  Keep it simple and keep it consistent. In how to teach a dog to stay, use only one word for stay.  The one word to use for stay should be “Down.” “Place,” and “Sit.” Why would you want your dog to do anything else then what you just asked your dog to do?  If I command my dog, “down,” I expect my dog to be down.  If my dog gets up, my dog broke the “down” command.  What is clearest to the dog is to re command “Down.” Down was what was commanded.  Down was what is wanted.  When Down does not happen re command Down.

The dog obedience commands of “Down,” “Place,” and “Sit,” ARE ALL STATIONARY COMMANDS to begin with.  The use of the word or command stay with one of these three stationary non movement commands is redundant, unnecessary, and only adds to confusion when learning how to teach a dog to stay. 

RE COMMAND THE LAST RIGHT BEHAVIOR

Dog Training Phoenix how to teach a dog to stay

 

  1. When learning how to teach a dog to stay your job is to give a command that is stationary by nature such as the “Down” command.
  2.  The next step is to keep the dog in the “Down” command and reward with positive reinforcement the correct behavior of down.  
  3. The third step is to re command “Down” anytime your dog stops the down command and behavior.

CREATE DISTRACTIONS AND REWARD CORRECT BEHAVIOR

When learning how to teach a dog to stay, the behavior is learned by creating distractions and rewarding the dog with positive reinforcement for not taking the bait of the distraction and maintaining the stationary command.  The behavior of staying when there are distractions is shaped by presenting the bait of a distraction and rewarding the dog if it does not take the bait.  The behavior of staying when there are distractions is also shaped by re commanding the behavior when the dog does take the bait.

HOW TO TEACH A DOG TO STAY HAPPENS FAST WHEN YOU COMMUNICATE IN A WAY THAT MATCHES AND MIRRORS THE WAY YOUR DOG THINKS AND PROCESSES INFORMATION.

Dog Trainer Phoenix how to teach a dog to stay

CALL NOW FOR DOG TRAINING HELP (602) 769-1411

We have often heard that “communication is key.”  When communication is clear, precise, and can be predictive as to a certain pattern, you are “speaking dog!”  Dogs are dialectical in nature.  Dogs learn by classical conditioning and by operant conditioning.  

Classical conditioning happens when two things are paired or bridged together.  An example of classical conditioning is when your cell phone rings you answer it.  The behavior of answering your phone when it rings is learned because the phone ringing has been paired with answering your phone. The timing has to be just right to make the connection between two or more things when they are being paired.  for the example of learning how to teach a dog to stay, the word or command down and the behavior of going down are paired and matched.  the dog learns with the repetitive timing of the word down with the behavior of down, what “Down” means.

Operant conditioning is basically the use of well timed rewards and consequences to shape behavior to increase or decrease.  Behaviors that are rewarded increase.  Behaviors that have consequences decrease.  An example of Operant conditioning in the “Down” as an implied stay training exercise is when the dog gets a high value food reward for staying in the down position when their are distractions.  Another example is when there is the consequence of not getting a food reward, and getting some leash pressure and re command into “Down.” 

With well timed rewards and consequences and very “black and white” communication even difficult behaviors like how to stay when there are insane distractions can be taught with relative ease.

how to teach a dog to stay service dog training

If you are struggling with having your dog listen, pay attention, be obedient and respond to commands, Give Phoenix Dog Training a Call today at (602) 769-1411

 

 

 


  • 0
Phoenix Dog Aggression Trainers

PHOENIX DOG TRAINING | DOG AGGRESSION | HOW TO STOP DOG AGGRESSION

PHOENIX DOG TRAINING | DOG AGGRESSION | HOW TO STOP DOG AGGRESSION

Dog aggression and how to stop dog aggression, and what to do to stop your dog from being aggressive, is what most of my calls are as a Dog Behaviorist. At Phoenix Dog Training, about 80% or more of the dog training problems we deal with is dog aggression. It can be heartbreaking to have a family pet that you love and that are great in so many different ways, but perhaps your dog is aggressive towards people, or your dog is aggressive towards other dogs. What can be particularly scary and heartbreaking about dog aggression is when you have multiple dogs fighting in the house.

Phoenix Dog Aggrssion Trainers

There are various types of dog aggression. Here are just a few types of dog aggression.

  • Fear Aggression
  • Territorial Aggression
  • Dog on Dog Aggression
  • Dog Aggression Towards Humans
  • Food Aggression
  • Toy Aggression
  • Fence or Gate Aggression
  • Dominance Aggression

The most common type of  Dog aggression is fear aggression. Almost all aggression is fear related aggression. Animals, including dogs, only go into “fight or flight” when there is a perceived threat. Many of the above listed types of aggression have fear as their primary motivator. Some dogs are afraid they will loose their food. Some dogs are afraid they will loose a bone or a favorite toy. Some dogs are afraid that their space or territory is in danger or being threatened. Some dogs fear that their owners are in danger or may experience a threat.

In many cases of aggression it can be difficult to see any real reason for the dog’s aggression. There are about 3% to 7% of dogs with genetic and neurochemical contributing factors to their aggression. This type of aggression can be the most difficult to deal with. In this type of aggression there may be no “real” threat to the dog yet the dog feels there is a threat and becomes reactively aggressive.

The number one goal is to properly assess the type of dog aggression and all of the many contributing factors that might play a role in the dog’s aggression. Old school dog training used to just assume basically any dog that was aggressive was just trying to be “alpha” and was showing dominance. After many decades of scientific research and studies on dog aggression, today we know that is rarely the case. In over 30 years as a dog aggression expert and dog behaviorist who specializes in dog aggression and has worked with and helped some of the most aggressive dogs in the country and abroad, I can honestly say true dominance aggression is very rare, and todays science and studies on aggression in dogs concurs with what has been my experience.

As a result of the latest scientific studies and research on dog aggression, we know today that the last thing you want to do is punish, harshly correct with pain, fear or intimidation, or dominate your dog with an ‘alpha roll.’ These outdated old school dog training methods have never show any long term success in rehabilitating an aggressive dog with lasting results and lasting success. These harsh methods actually add more stress and pressure, along with adding more fear to the dog that is already experiencing something it finds threatening. We want to teach the dog that there is no threat, that the dog can be calm and safe. These old school correction based Dog Obedience Training methods that are harsh do the opposite. We often see other trainers have limited success for a week or two until the dog then snaps and becomes even more aggressive, and often times the dog can become aggressive toward the owner who has been wrongly taught to give a harsh correction to their dog. This is what for real serious cases of dog aggression you need a dog behaviorist.

Phoenix Dog Training has the highest success rate when it comes to treating and rehabilitating dog aggression anywhere in the country. A lot of what Phoenix Dog Training and our Internationally Acclaimed Harvard Dog Behaviorist do is fix and treat aggressive dogs that other dog trainers cannot rehabilitate. We have rehabilitated many dogs that some top trainers and celebrity TV dog trainers have not had lasting success with. Our approach and our system to treat and rehabilitate dog aggression is based in the latest science, and research on dog aggression behavior modification, counterconditioning, and desensitization, along with the latest science in canine cognition.   At Phoenix Dog Training our Harvard Educated Dog Behaviorist specifically studied canine cognition at Harvard University and used that knowledge and education to create what is today’s most successful dog aggression rehabilitation training system.

If you have a dog with an aggression problem call today to schedule an in depth 2-3 hour behavioral assessment and evaluation. After completion of our behaviorist assessment you will be provided with a treatment plan and behavior modification program that we can begin to work on that day to bring about the needed change in your dog’s aggression.

Call today to schedule your AGGRESSION EVALUATION appointment (602) 769-1411

 


  • 0
Dog Training Phoenix

PHOENIX DOG TRAINING | PHOENIX DOG BEHAVIORIST | SEVERE DOG OBEDIENCE AND BEHAVIOR

PHOENIX DOG TRAINING | PHOENIX DOG BEHAVIORIST |SEVERE DOG OBEDIENCE AND  BEHAVIOR

Even The Most Severe Dog Behavior Issues Are No Match For Phoenix Dog Training and Phoenix Dog Behaviorist

Dog Training Phoenix

There are few names as celebrated in the world of dog obedience training as that of Phoenix Dog Training. While the industry is home to many amateurs masquerading as dog trainers, Phoenix Dog Training has made the study of dog behavior and the development of a unique and proven canine training philosophy their lifetime’s work. Harvard-trained and world-renowned as an Applied Animal Behaviorist, Phoenix Dog Training have made a career of consistently rehabilitating dogs suffering from the most severe of behavioral problems. Issues such as severe aggression, fear-based behavior, anxiety and phobias often get the best of pet owners and even experienced dog trainers, but for Phoenix Dog Training and their Applied Animal Behaviorist, they are par for the course.

Our Phoenix Dog Trainer is a committed student of the true science of canine learning theory, dog aggression is not going to be rehabilitated and cured with positive reinforcement only, that is why our Phoenix Dog Trainers and Phoenix Dog Behaviorist use both positive and negative reinforcement for a balanced approach to dog training and a true understanding of the science behind learning theory. This has allowed our Dog Trainers in Phoenix to develop our patented Gentle Touch™ method of dog training. Based upon the principles of Operant and Classical Conditioning in order to deal with issues including:

  • Aggression
  • Fear
  • Anxiety
  • Phobias
  • Not listening
  • Potty training
  • Digging and chewing
  • Jumping on people
  • Defecating in improper areas
  • Jumping on furniture
  • Pulling on the leash
  • Dominance
  • Running away
  • Stealing things
  • Scratching doors
  • Begging and whining
  • Aggression in dogs
  • Fighting with other dogs
  • Crotch sniffing
  • Bad car behavior
  • Separation anxiety
  • Fearfulness and shyness
  • Marking
  • Chasing cars
  • Chasing kids
  • Chasing cats

Dog Training Phoenix believes that in-home private dog training is the most effective and fastest way to train your dog: after all, the problems that are occurring with your dog occur at home, so what better place to address these issues than where they take place? Another important aspect of the training Dog Training Phoenix provide is that you are being trained along with your dog. The goal is for your dog to work as effectively with you as he/she does when working with an animal behaviorist. You’ll learn how to communicate your intentions to your dog in a way that engenders understanding and results.

Canine training and puppy training need not be stressful or confusing for the dog involved: to the contrary, even when dealing with severe behavioral issues it can be a positive experience when based on a true understanding of dog behavior theory. Discover the true essence of proper dog training from Phoenix Dog Training and our acclaimed Animal Behaviorist.

For more Phoenix Dog Training Dog Behavior and Dog Training Articles, Visit our Phoenix Dog Training Blog.

 Follow us on Facebook

|Home| |Phoenix Dog Training| |Puppy Training| |Phoenix Dog Trainer|Severe Behavior Problems |Phoenix Dog Behaviorist|Aggressive Dog Training| |Anxiety and Phobic Dog Training| |Service Dog Training| |About Phoenix Dog Training| |Phoenix Dog Trainer Reviews||Phoenix Dog Training Blog|Dog Training Services Valleywide|Glendale Dog Training|Scottsdale Dog Training |$50,000 Charity Dog Training Challenge |Contact Phoenix Dog Training|Cities and Zip Codes we Serve|


  • 0

Should I Use Negative Reinforcement to Train My Dog?

There is nothing negative with negative reinforcement

Using negative reinforcement to teach your dog to not pull on the leash

My approach to Dog Training, behavior modification and dog obedience training is based on years of study. As one of the foremost students of dog behavior I have seen firsthand the effect of a combination of Operant Conditioning, Positive Reinforcement and Negative Reinforcement.

I have made these techniques the centerpieces of my training philosophy, which specializes in the elimination of aggression, fears, anxieties and phobias in dogs, as well as typical nusaince dog behaviors. 

 At Phoenix Dog Training we are always eager to counteract the flashing red lights some people see when they hear the word “negative reinforcement.”

Don’t let the term Negative reinforcement scare you, because in truth it isn’t negative at all! In fact it is non-aversive, as we don’t believe any dog should be trained with fear, pain or intimidation. As an example consider the following:

  • I am walking a dog and want to turn right
  • The dog wants to continue going straight
  • I tap the dog on the shoulder to get its attention so it can turn with me

That is all there is to negative reinforcement!

By combining all of the aforementioned aspects of training, Phoenix Dog Training are able to make their intentions clear to puppies and dogs. By opening the lines of communication he is able to provide a low stress atmosphere for puppy training and canine training while getting lasting results in a fraction of the time of other Phoenix dog trainers.

We are committed to providing dog training classes that offer the least amount of stress and the quickest results. Remember, we are training you as well as your dog, and the knowledge and insight you’ll gain into your dog’s mind and regarding the techniques with which to communicate your wishes will result in lasting good behavior and a more balanced home life. Contact us today for help with training your dog and correcting unwanted behaviors. (602) 769-1411

Follow us on Facebook

|Home| |Phoenix Dog Training| |Puppy Training| |Phoenix Dog Trainer|Severe Behavior Problems |Phoenix Dog Behaviorist|Aggressive Dog Training| |Anxiety and Phobic Dog Training| |Service Dog Training| |About Phoenix Dog Training| |Phoenix Dog Trainer Reviews||Phoenix Dog Training Blog|Dog Training Services Valleywide|Glendale Dog Training|Scottsdale Dog Training |$50,000 Charity Dog Training Challenge |Contact Phoenix Dog Training|Cities and Zip Codes we Serve|


  • 0
Phoenix Dog Training History of Dog Training

PHOENIX DOG TRAINING | A BRIEF HISTORY OF DOG TRAINING

PHOENIX DOG TRAINING

Phoenix Dog Training and Phoenix Dog Trainers Providing Dog Obedience Training Phoenix Az and Phoenix Puppy Training

A Brief History of Dog Training: What You Need To Know

 Dogs have lived and worked with humans for as long as history can recall, providing us with companionship, security and assistance. The idea of training a dog is not new; in fact, dogs have been helping us to hunt, track, guard and herd livestock, as well as assist the disabled for centuries. However, even in our modern world, humans still cannot agree on which methods or theories are best to train a dog to behave as a pet. Most of the disagreements on how to train a dog come from the two major camps of dog training methods: Force Extremists and Positive Reinforcement Extremists.

The Rise of Negative-Enforcement Only Training

During the Great Depression, dog training began to grow in national popularity. At this time, food was scarce for humans, much less dogs, so trainers did not use edible treats to reward a dog for good behavior. Instead, good behaviors were rewarded with praise and undesirable behaviors were corrected with a small punishment, such as a quick jerk on a choke chain. This would condition the dog to avoid performing behaviors that cause pain.

Phoenix Dog Training The History of Dog Training William Koehler

The most popular pioneer in this dog training method was William Koehler, author of the best-selling dog obedience book The Koehler Method of Dog Training from 1962 – 1982. Koehler believed that training was a battle of wills and that it was harmful to dogs to allow them to go without correction for bad behaviors. While Koehler was a great trainer (you may have seen some of his four-legged students in Disney’s The Incredible Journey) he did not fully accept animal behavior theories. He assumed that dogs would understand why they were being punished and learn from it, as a rational person might. Anyone who has trained a dog knows that a dog does not learn behavior in the same way a human might, though they most certainly take cues from well-behaved owners.

Koehler’s influence remains very evident in some of the popular training methods of today, especially those that insist that dogs have a pack mentality and are always involved in a conspiracy to take dominance from the humans. Here is an example of how this mentality is way of misunderstanding a dog: if your dog pulls you along on walks and you never take the time to teach him to walk with you, it is not the dog’s fault for being dominant. He likely has a desire to see and smell the world around him and does not understand that he must walk along with you
rather than do as he pleases. This is not because he thinks he controls you, but by not setting rules and boundaries for the way your dog interacts with the world while on a leash, you effectively teach him that it is okay to pull you along. You do end up following him when he pulls you, so he is assured that you will be there with him while he does whatever he wants. What the dog really needs is to be trained to walk nicely because it is expected of him and in his best interests, and he will not learn that on his own.

A Generation of Only Positive Reinforcement Training

Phoenix Dog Training Clicker TrainingThe generation that came after Koehler in the 1980s championed a more positive dog training style that focused on rewarding good behavior with food or toys rather than correcting mistakes. One of the founders of this movement, veterinarian Ian Dunbar, started the then-unusual practice of puppy socialization, off-leash training and the lavish use of treats for rewards. Total Positive Reinforcement remains popular today, but unfortunately is unreliable when used alone and without any negative reinforcement whatsoever. This approach is fairly laissez-faire (hands-off) because it requires you to literally wait for the dog to decide on its own to behave in the desired way without any guidance from you. For example, if you tell your untrained dog to “sit” using only positive reinforcement, you must literally wait for him to decide to sit and then lavishly praise him when he does. He does deserve a reward for sitting, but if he does not understand what the command means to begin with, then you have not taught him anything. By the time he sits down, he has forgotten the cue “sit” altogether, and perceives that you are randomly giving him a treat. Not only does it take a long time for the dog to do what he is told, but he also may get frustrated when he does not have a clear expectation of what you want. Appropriate negative reinforcement would help in this case by allowing you to say the command “sit” at the same time as you push the dog’s rear end onto the ground. Once the dog sits, you can remove your hand from his behind and reward him with praise or a treat. Repetition of this activity allows the dog to connect the word “sit” with the physical act of sitting.

Attempting to use a clicker and treats to train a dog is only effective in very controlled environments. Your dog may be motivated to sit and stay for a treat while in his own home, but the second you have him sit and stay in an uncontrolled environment and he sees something more interesting, his desire to interact with that distraction (chasing a cat, wrestling with another
dog, stealing a child’s ice cream, etc.) is going to be much stronger than his desire to have a treat. The fact that you have a polite dog at home means absolutely nothing when his behavior is out of your control where it matters: in public.

Balanced Dog Training Method Used by Phoenix Dog Training

Dog Training Phoenix Balanced Dog Training

Balanced Dog Training

Negative Reinforcement, when used in conjunction with positive reinforcement does not mean pain, punishment or harsh corrections. Instead, in the Balanced Dog Training method, used at Phoenix Dog Training, negative reinforcement is a way to show the dog what it needs to do. For example, when you train a horse to turn to the left when the left rein is pulled, you are essentially using the annoying sensation of the bit in the horse’s mouth to show the horse what you want it to do. The horse reacts to alleviate the annoyance of the bit. Conversely, if you respond to undesirable behaviors by giving in to them, you only allow your dog to control you. Compare this to the analogy of a child throwing a tantrum in a store after his mother does not buy him a candy bar. If the mother gives in after his tantrum and gets the kid some candy, the child realizes that he has just taught his mother a new trick. He now assumes he can always have his way by throwing a tantrum. This same principle applies with dogs.

Phoenix Dog Training is able train dogs quickly and effectively because we take the time to understand why your dog acts out and work to motivate a total behavior change both in you as the owner and in your dog. Our Balanced Dog Training approach and method combines all aspects of learning theory and is constantly improving. As our knowledge grows, our toolbox of dog training tools expands, allowing us to find the right fit for each unique animal we meet. We also give you the tools you need to be the kind of owner your dog needs and provide him with the structure and attention he needs to continue to behave as he should with our lifetime guarantee.

For more information on Phoenix Dog Training and our training methods or to learn more about dog training from Harvard Educated Dog Behaviorist, call (602) 769-1411 today.

Follow us on FaceBook


  • 0
phoenix dog training top 10 mistakes dog owners make

Phoenix Dog Training | Top 10 Dog Training Mistakes

Phoenix Dog Training | Top 10 Dog Training Mistakes

Dog Training and Dog Behavior Problems can oftentimes be avoided when dog owners know the critical do’s and don’ts in how they create, add to or contribute to a misbehaved and poorly trained puppy or dog.

The #1 Biggest Mistake Dog Owners Make is Not Getting Dog Obedience Training For Their Dog or Puppy.  95% or more of the typical dog training and dog behavior problems could be eliminated with just a few Dog Training lessons.  Call Dog Training Phoenix for details and pricing for our Phoenix Dog Obedience Training or our Phoenix puppy training now 602-769-1411

dog-training-phoenix

Follow us on Facebook

|Home| |Phoenix Dog Training| |Puppy Training| |Phoenix Dog Trainer|Severe Behavior Problems |Phoenix Dog Behaviorist|Aggressive Dog Training| |Anxiety and Phobic Dog Training| |Service Dog Training| |About Phoenix Dog Training| |Phoenix Dog Trainer Reviews||Phoenix Dog Training Blog|Dog Training Services Valleywide|Glendale Dog Training|Scottsdale Dog Training |$50,000 Charity Dog Training Challenge |Contact Phoenix Dog Training|